NIH Nanomedicine Development Centers 5th Annual Awardee Meeting | March 28-29, 2011

Agenda

Unless otherwise noted, all sessions will take place in the Haverford/Baccarat rooms

Monday, March 28

NDC Translational Path

7:45 a.m. - 9:00 a.m.

Registration and Light Refreshments

8:15

NIH Nanomedicine Initiative Project Team Meets With Clinical Consulting Boards
(Cartier/Tiffany Rooms)

8:45

Welcome and Introductions
Richard Fisher, Ph.D.
Jeffery Schloss, Ph.D.
Paul Sieving, M.D., Ph.D.
NIH Nanomedicine Initiative Project Team

8:55

NIH Common Fund
James Anderson, M.D., Ph.D.
Director
NIH Division of Program Coordination, Planning, and Strategic Initiatives, Office of the Director, NIH

9:10

Translational Research at the NIH
Rajesh Ranganathan, Ph.D.
Office of the Director, NIH

9:30

Nanomedicine Center for Mechanobiology Directing the Immune Response

T-Cell Adoptive Therapy in the Clinic: The Importance of Cell Culture Technology
Carl June, M.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Regulation of T-Cell Activation and Expansion by Control of the Stimulatory Substrate Elasticity
Michael Milone, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Nanoscale Materials for Improved Activation and Expansion of T Cells
Lance Kam, Ph.D., M.S.
Columbia University

10:20

Center for Protein Folding Machinery

Chaperonin-Based Therapies for Huntingon’s Disease and Von Hippel-Lindau Disease
Eric Jonasch, M.D.
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

11:10

Break

11:25

Center for Cell Control

CCC’s Translation Pathway-Manipulating Key Protein Complexes by Combinatorial Medicine
Chih-Ming Ho, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

11:45

NDC for the Optical Control of Biological Function

Restoration of Vision-I: One-Component Photoswitch Systems
Russell Van Gelder, M.D., Ph.D.
University of Washington

Restoration of Vision-II: Two-Component Photoswitch Systems
John Flannery, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Restoration of Vision-III: Primate Model
William Merigan, Ph.D.
University of Rochester

Restoration of Vision-IV: Canine Models of Inherited Retinal Degeneration
William Beltran, D.V.M., Ph.D.
University of Pennsylvania

12:35 p.m.

Lunch and Posters
(Waterford/Lalique Rooms)

(Even-numbered posters will be presented during this time.)

2:00

Engineering Cellular Control: Synthetic Signaling and Motility Systems

Engineering Cellular Control: Synthetic Signaling and Motility Systems
Wendell Lim, Ph.D.
University of California, San Francisco

2:20

Nanomedicine Center for Nucleoprotein Machines

Development of a Nanomedicine Platform Technology To Cure Sickle Cell Disease
Steffen Meiler, M.D.
Georgia Health Sciences University

Using the Concepts of Nanomedicine To Cure Sickle Cell Disease: Challenges and the Path Forward
Matthew Porteus, M.D., Ph.D.
Stanford University

ZFN Delivery: Transformative Approaches for the Translational Path
William Dynan, Ph.D.
Georgia Health Sciences University

Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation Using Genetically Corrected Stem Cells for the Treatment of Sickle Cell Disease  
Adam Hartigan, Ph.D.
Joslin Diabetes Center and Harvard Medical School

3:10

Break

3:30

Translational Considerations and Discussion

Engineering T Cells for HIV Resistance: Bench-to-Bedside Lessons
Carl June, M.D.
University of Pennsylvania

Lessons Learned From the NCI’S Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory
Scott McNeil, Ph.D.
Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory, NCI, NIH

The FDA Review Process for Clinical Trials
Andrew Byrnes, Ph.D.
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Steven Fleischer, D.V.M.
U.S. Food and Drug Administration

Toxicity Considerations
Martin Philbert, Ph.D.
University of Michigan

Panel Discussion

~5:30

Evening Poster and Networking Session

Tuesday, March 29th

NDC Progress

8:00 a.m.

Registration and Light Refreshments

8:30

Nanomedicine Center for Nucleoprotein Machines

Nanomedicine Center for Nucleoprotein Machines: A Progress Overview
Gang Bao, Ph.D.
Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University

Transferrin-Conjugated Zinc Finger Nucleases for Gene Correction: Production, Delivery, and Characterization  
Janmejay Pandey, Ph.D.
Georgia Health Sciences University

Genetic Engineering of Mutant ZFNs for the Development of Photoswitchable ZFNs
Yiyi Zhang, Ph.D.
Georgia Institute of Technology

Examination of Repair Pathway Choice Between the NHEJ and HR Nanomachineries Upon Zinc Finger Nuclease-Induced Double-Strand Breaks
R. Ileng Kumaran, Ph.D.
Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

Detecting Off-Target ZFN-Induced Rearrangements Genome-Wide
Martina Mijuskovic, Ph.D.
New York University

9:30

NDC for the Optical Control of Biological Function

Light-Gated Receptors: From Cells to Intact Circuits
Ehud Isacoff, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley, and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Optochemical Genetics
Martin Sumser, Ph.D.
Ludwig-Maximilians University

Optical Manipulation of Pain Circuits
Richard Kramer, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

10:30

Break

11:00

Center for Cell Control

Attacking Signaling Complexes To Battle Leukemia
Michael Teitell, M.D., Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

Application of PhosphoFlow and CyTOF Technologies To Dissect Roles of Protein Complexes in Disease Treatment
Garry Nolan, Ph.D.
Stanford University

Tunable Nanoplasmonic Resonators and Optoelectronic Tweezers
Ming Wu, Ph.D.
University of California, Berkeley

Developing Clinically Enabling Human Embryonic Stem-Cell Culture Through Feedback System Control
Hideaki Tsutsui, Ph.D.
University of California, Los Angeles

12:00 p.m.

Lunch and Posters
(Waterford/Lalique Rooms)

(Odd-numbered posters will be presented during this time.)

1:30

Center for Protein Folding Machinery

Neuroprotective Role(s) of TRiC Subunits Against Axonal Dysfunction Caused by Mutant Huntingtin: A Live Imaging Study of Axonal Transport of Neurotrophic Signals
Willam Mobley, M.D., Ph.D.
University of California, San Diego

ApiCCT1 Modulates Mutant Htt Phenotypes
Emily Mitchell
University of California, Irvine

A Direct In Vivo Assay in Mouse Stratum for the Modulation of Huntington’s Disease Pathology by the Eukaryotic Chaperonin Tric 
David Housman, Ph.D.
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2:30

Engineering Cellular Control: Synthetic Signaling and Motility Systems

Synthetic Biology in Translational Medicine: Engineering T-Cell Responses for Cancer Therapy
Wilson Wong, Ph.D.
University of California San Francisco

Engineering Cellular Homing Systems and Cargo-Carrying Capabilities To Enhance Cell-Based Cancer Therapy
Jason Park, M.Eng.
University of California San Francisco

Engineering Complex Therapeutic Vesicles
Ross Rounsevell, Ph.D., M.S.
University of California, Berkeley

3:30

Break

3:45

Nanomedicine Center for Mechanobiology Directing the Immune Response

T-Cell Mechanotransduction Studies Based on CasL, Myosin II, Talin, and Fibronectin Fibrils
Michael Dustin, Ph.D.
New York University

Search for Regulators and Modulators of Rigidity Sensing
Benny Geiger, Ph.D.
Weizmann Institute

Large-Scale Learning of Immune System Regulatory Modules and Networks: Application to T-Cell Differentiation and Function
Richard Bonneau, Ph.D.
New York University

Screening of T-Cell Activation With Nanostructured Substrates
Alexander Gondarenko, Ph.D.
Columbia University

4:45

CLOSING REMARKS